The Best of Times, the Worst of Times

By Richard Papale

On February 22, NAFSA Executive Director and CEO Esther D. Brimmer, DPhil, gave the keynote address at the Association of International Education Administrators (AIEA) annual conference. With the befitting title, “The Best of Times, the Worst of Times,” Brimmer emphasized that the work, unity, and resilience of international educators is more important than ever as we look to the challenges and opportunities ahead.... See More

Why Study Abroad Matters…

November 04, 2016 | Topics: Education Abroad

By Mark Farmer

As former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said, “In the 21st century, a quality education is an international education.” The global skills, knowledge, and experiences that are gained while studying abroad have a profound impact on a student’s ability to compete and collaborate with graduates from around the world and produce a... See More

Positive Momentum Builds to Restore Relations with Cuba

March 07, 2016 | Topics: Foreign Policy, Education Abroad

By Alan Fleming

U.S. academic travel to Cuba was decimated by severe executive branch directives in 2004. Consequently, most study abroad programs conducted by American institutions in Cuba shuttered, effectively abandoning one of the only avenues of understanding and collaboration that existed between our two countries.

The resulting 92% plummet in U.S. students studying in Cuba proved nearly fatal for Cuban exchange programs. The few programs that managed to remain open following the restrictions limped forward until January 2011, when NAFSA: Association of International Educators, the academic exchange community, and the larger coalition won a historic advocacy victory with the Obama Administration’s executive action to restore academic travel.

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Finding Inspiration and Innovation at NAFSA’s Strategic Retreat for Education Abroad Leaders

September 08, 2015 | Topics: Education Abroad

By Amanda Kelso

This past July I had the opportunity to attend NAFSA’s Strategic Retreat for Education Abroad Leaders in Washington, D.C. Like most full-time administrators, my days are filled with a steady stream of e-mails, meetings, and crises (both big and small), making it a struggle to reflect on and discuss big-picture ideas. The prospect of a two-day retreat with colleagues to focus on and discuss strategy was appealing.... See More

NAFSA's EA Visa Helpers Take to DC

March 20, 2015 | Topics: Education Abroad, Leadership

By María José Angel Mex

As an early Christmas present last year, I was appointed by NAFSA as a consular affairs liaison to the Italian consulate in Houston, Texas. At the time, I had an idea of what my responsibilities would be, but I knew I still had a lot to learn. This proved to be true earlier this year when I attended NAFSA's consular affairs liaison (CAL) training in Washington D.C, along with the 40 other members of the  CAL Subcommittee.... See More

2015 Student Mobility Forecast

February 10, 2015 | Topics: Education Abroad

By NAFSA

With new tools providing greater understanding of the motives for student mobility and what drives students to seek out educational experiences abroad, international education professionals now have the unique opportunity to better anticipate where the next educational destination will be.... See More

White House Focuses on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship at Travel Bloggers Summit

December 11, 2014 | Topics: Advocacy and Public Policy, Education Abroad

By Marlene M. Johnson

Earlier this week, I made the quick three-block trip from the NAFSA office to the White House for an energizing afternoon with government officials, media representatives, and travel bloggers. As an important driver of public opinion, the media have the ability to use their influential voices to educate readers about the importance of study abroad and encourage more U.S. students to engage in meaningful travel. This was the goal of the White House Summit on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship, to raise awareness of the benefits of cross-cultural education and cultural exchange, while boosting international student mobility across borders.... See More

Ebola: The U.S. Crisis that Wasn’t and What It Means for You

November 19, 2014 | Topics: Education Abroad

By Julie Anne Friend

First, a disclaimer – I'm a lawyer, not a doctor, so the purpose of this blog post is not to provide medical advice, but to reference verifiable medical information and how it can be used to support your risk management strategies, as well as communication efforts, in managing a real or perceived health crisis.

Ebola hemorrhagic fever and I go way back. We first met in 1995 while I was a graduate student in Lusaka, Zambia. There was an outbreak of Ebola along our northern border with the Democratic Republic of Congo (then Zaire). Three hundred and fifteen people died in a village called Kikwit. It was big news, but I can't really recall how. There were no cell phones, no Internet, and certainly no Twitter. E-mail existed, but access was sporadic and cumbersome. I think I learned everything I needed to know from CNN. I don't remember being alarmed or afraid. I was right there - well, nearby - and I was not at all afraid.

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The Role of International Exchange in the Trilateral Partnership of Japan, Korea, and the United States

By Mallory Meiser

Japan and South Korea hold top 10 spots for the number of students they have studying in the United States. However, when it comes to the number of U.S. students studying in Japan and South Korea, they take 14th and 23rd place respectively.  As the United States increasingly turns its focus toward East Asia, how does international exchange affect the developing relationships?... See More

Skills Gap or Disconnect? Translating Study Abroad Experiences to Workplace Skills

March 29, 2013 | Topics: Careers, Education Abroad

By Mallory Meiser

Less than a year ago when I was fresh out of college starting my job search, I was disheartened by the lack of emphasis employers put on my study abroad experience. More often than not, my five months in Europe were discounted as a holiday or “social experiment” as opposed an educational endeavor, the experience overlooked in favor of GPA and the rigor of my courses. ... See More