White House Focuses on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship at Travel Bloggers Summit

December 11, 2014 | Topics: Advocacy and Public Policy, Education Abroad

By Marlene M. Johnson

Earlier this week, I made the quick three-block trip from the NAFSA office to the White House for an energizing afternoon with government officials, media representatives, and travel bloggers. As an important driver of public opinion, the media have the ability to use their influential voices to educate readers about the importance of study abroad and encourage more U.S. students to engage in meaningful travel. This was the goal of the White House Summit on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship, to raise awareness of the benefits of cross-cultural education and cultural exchange, while boosting international student mobility across borders.... See More

Ebola: The U.S. Crisis that Wasn’t and What It Means for You

November 19, 2014 | Topics: Education Abroad

By Julie Anne Friend

First, a disclaimer – I'm a lawyer, not a doctor, so the purpose of this blog post is not to provide medical advice, but to reference verifiable medical information and how it can be used to support your risk management strategies, as well as communication efforts, in managing a real or perceived health crisis.

Ebola hemorrhagic fever and I go way back. We first met in 1995 while I was a graduate student in Lusaka, Zambia. There was an outbreak of Ebola along our northern border with the Democratic Republic of Congo (then Zaire). Three hundred and fifteen people died in a village called Kikwit. It was big news, but I can't really recall how. There were no cell phones, no Internet, and certainly no Twitter. E-mail existed, but access was sporadic and cumbersome. I think I learned everything I needed to know from CNN. I don't remember being alarmed or afraid. I was right there - well, nearby - and I was not at all afraid.

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