Global Studies Literature Review - No. 9, January 2019

 

New Models and Emerging Perspectives in Global Education



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Table of Contents

The Global Studies Literature Review editorial team welcomes you to explore the many thoughtful contributions to Issue No. 9, "New Models and Emerging Perspectives in Global Education," including a special introduction celebrating the 15 year anniversary of the Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship Knowledge Community (TLS KC) by KC Chair Sora H. Friedman, PhD. We received a record number of submissions for this issue, in part due to the enhanced promotion and support from the NAFSA editorial team. The topic prompted many of our readers—and many new contributors—to explore some of the inspiring new work in international education.

This robust engagement highlights the range of our field's professional practices, a theme at the heart of Bernhard Streitwieser and Anthony C. Ogden's edited volume International Higher Education's Scholar-Practitioners: Bridging Research and Practice(2016),reviewed in this issue. Ashley T. Simmons's synopsis emphasizes the editors' case that the melded role of many international education professionals is crucial not only to our field's research and practice, but even more significant to the ways in which academic knowledge is globalized through international education. We are proud to be part of that influence in the field of global education.

Bryan McAllister-Grande's pair of interviews with authors of two different volumes that examine international higher education points to the range of topics and approaches apparent in recent literature. His interview with Daniel Arhaya, coauthor with Peter Marber of The Evolution of Liberal Arts in the Global Age (2017), addresses the changing nature of liberal arts education in an era of global technology. Araya argues that the new reality of artificial intelligence has the potential to affect higher education with a future-oriented, problem-based pedagogy that will benefit from the critical capacities of the traditional liberal arts. On the other hand, Christopher Minnix, interviewed about his new work, Rhetoric and the Global Turn in Higher Education (2018), looks to the ancient art of rhetoric for insights on global learning as the way that we learn to communicate across borders, through what he terms "transnational global ecologies." These arts of communication are critical for dialogue, debate, and the power of global discourses—or transnational rhetoric—to shape our local, social, and economic lives.

Several of the new publications reviewed in this issue speak directly to our theme of new models and emerging perspectives. John Hudzik, a prominent scholar in international education, reviews the volume edited by Douglas Proctor and Laura Rumbley, The Future Agenda for Internationalization in Higher Education: Next Generation Insights into Research (2018), acknowledging new voices in the field. He takes particular interest in Hiro Saito's contribution to the volume—regarding the implications of internationalization in the promotion of civil society, especially at the local level—as well as the new experiences of internationalization outside of Western institutions. His insights provide further question into the direction the next generation of internationalization developments will take. Jeff Blair reviews Hans de Wit, Jocelyne Gacel-Ávila, Elspeth Jones, and Nico Jooste's edited work, The Globalization of Internationalization: Emerging Voices and Perspectives (2017), which offers greater depth with critical new voices from the periphery. Blair notes the important contribution of the volume in articulating innovative practices, models, and insights from diverse cultural regions and market initiatives. He also addresses the new inequities that arise as a result of market-drive education, the continued dominance of Western academic paradigms, and the impact that armed conflict, forced migration, and resource scarcity have on global higher education in the twenty-first century.

Paloma Rodriguez's summary of Hilary Landorf, Stephanie Doscher, and Jaffus Hardrick's Making Global Learning Universal: Promoting Inclusion and Success for All Students (2018), relates Florida International University's shift away from traditional internationalization strategies to an alternative focus on the pedagogies of global learning. Instead of building an internationalization approach around mobility and expanded international coursework, this approach is oriented towards the principles of diversity, inclusion, and communication across difference to solve shared problems. Rodriguez notes the groundbreaking nature of this approach and its focus on the ways in which students engage with and across difference.

These themes of inclusion and diversity as central components of new approaches to international education are explored in other volumes reviewed in this issue. Heather Barclay Hamir and Nick J. Gozik's edited volume, Promoting Inclusion in Education Abroad: A Handbook of Research and Practice (2018), reviewed by Bryan McAllister-Grande, applies the "inclusive excellence" approach to diversity and inclusion as promoted by the American Association of Colleges and Universities. The latest work of James A. Banks, Citizenship Education and Global Migration: Implications for Theory, Research, and Teaching (2017), is reviewed by Rosalind Raby. Banks, a founder of the field of multicultural education, addresses critical questions of how citizenship regimes are reflected in school curricula in ways that represent, include, or marginalize communities based on their status in the community. Nicholas Santavicca's account of Tamara Yakaboski and Brett Perozzi'sInternationalizing U.S. Student Affairs Practice: An Intercultural and Inclusive Framework (2018) notes the important and often neglected role that student affairs professionals play in internationalization efforts, especially through the integration of international and domestic multicultural student inclusivity. These new contributions, both on campus and abroad, reflect a shift in focus toward the inclusion and interculturality shaping global learning pedagogy.

Steven Duke's review essay on two new edited volumes, Jane Jackson and Susan Oguro's Intercultural Interventions in Study Abroad (2018) and Darla Deardorff and Lily Arasaratnam-Smith's Intercultural Competence in Higher Education: International Approaches, Assessment and Application (2017), summarizes new developments in the field of intercultural education. His account of Jackson and Oguro's collection emphasizes the scaffolding of intercultural skills in study abroad learning through a constructivist approach, a model based on important recent research on intercultural education. Deardorff and Arasaratnam-Smith's compendium builds on this perspective with case studies of intercultural competence development across a range of fields and cultural contexts, on campus and off. Duke commends these authors for providing new examples drawn from outside the U.S. sociocultural framework in ways that expand our understanding of intercultural competence, especially in chapters on humility, empathy, reciprocity, and peacebuilding. Jana Van der Veer's synopsis of Deardorff and Arasaratnam-Smith's edited volume also underscores the constructivist approach across multinational perspectives along with scaffolded approaches to intercultural learning in different academic disciplines.

Van der Veer also offers an intriguing synopsis of Gish Jen's Girl at the Baggage Claim (2017), a striking new reflection on cultural perspectives of the "self." Van der Veer notes that Jen's concepts of "big pit" and "flexi selves" can provide useful starting points for conversations with students as means of understanding how they fit into local cultural norms, either on campus or abroad.

Language is a critical marker of self-identity and is featured in two reviews found in this issue: Kathleen Stein-Smith's review of Fabrice Jaumont's The Bilingual Revolution: The Future of Education is in Two Languages (2017) and Kathleen Campbell Monich's review of Florian Coulmas's An Introduction to Multilingualism: Language in a Changing World (2018). Stein-Smith portrays Jaumont's impassioned case for the value of bilingual education, noting that Jaumont does not limit this argument to the personal, civil, and cognitive values of bilingualism, but also frames the value of bilingual education as one of educational equity for children who are speakers of other languages. Coulmas's work emphasizes the increasingly common reality of multilingualism; Monich draws special attention to Coulmas's discussion of linguistic strategies of multilingual speakers, with implications for traditional foreign language or bilingual education learning methods. More importantly, Coulmas's notion of "translanguaging" suggests that the way people learn languages in a rapidly changing global society is an evolving phenomenon with implications for understanding the role of world languages.

An additional set of reviews in this issue broaden the frames of analysis to institutional and disciplinary systems. Rachel Gable considers James Mittelman's caution in his Implausible Dream: The World-Class University and Repurposing Higher Education (2018) that the development of "world-class" universities is linked to a market-driven commodification of knowledge, diminishing the potential for transformative learning in higher education unless institutions are attentive to local realities and historical contexts. Jonathan Larson's review of Mitchell Stevens, Cynthia Miller-Idriss, and Seteney Shami's Seeing the World: How U.S. Universities Make Knowledge in a Global Era (2018) notes the irony that the interdisciplinary fields that comprise area studies, originally considered sites of global knowledge, appear now to be more provincial in their epistemologies in contrast to other disciplines. This text provides both sociology and intellectual histories of the academic disciplines within the context of globalized higher education. As a different example from an area studies field, Joseph Stanley's review of Timothy Snyder's The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America (2018), draws lessons from recent political history of Russia and the reach of totalitarian ideology across Europe and the United States. Stanley provides an example of how area studies itself might be "globalized" through these inevitable connections in our interconnected world.

And finally, Dawn Michele Whitehead's account of Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad (2018) by Eric Hartman, Richard Kiely, Christopher Boettcher, and Jessica Friedrichs reminds us that we do not need to leave our country to engage in the practice of interculturality; globalization influences communities at home and abroad, regardless of national borders. The volume sets forth a framework for exploring cultural differences in terms of power, positionality, and privilege, based on a philosophy grounded in the ethics of community engagement. This work has far-reaching implications for the entire international education field, as we all work in communities of one kind or another—whether these are institutional partnerships, local community organizations, "field work" abroad, or even our own academic disciplines.

We are grateful to our contributors for their commitment to these endeavors and encourage our readers to explore the works shared in this edition of The Global Studies Literature Review. The Review continues to be strengthened as we evolve with NAFSA's wonderful support and we welcome you to be part of this community.

Rebecca Hovey and Bryan McAllister-Grande | Coeditors, Issue No. 9

Table of Contents

Download the full issue for free at NAFSA's online bookstore.

Critiques and Reform of Higher Ed

Universities and the Globalization Trap (Review Essay)
Implausible Dream: The World-Class University and Repurposing Higher Education by James Mittelman

On Lenses and Vision: Remaking Area and Disciplinary Knowledge at U.S. Universities in a Global Era (Review Essay)
Seeing the World: How U.S. Universities Make Knowledge in a Global Era by Mitchell L. Stevens, Cynthia Miller-Idriss, and Seteney Shami

The Liberal Arts in an Age of Robotics (Interview)
Interview with Daniel Araya, coeditor of The Evolution of Liberal Arts in the Global Age

The Eclipse of Global Citizenship?: How "Transnational Rhetorical Citizenship" Might Replace a Contested Idea (Interview)
Interview with Christopher Minnix, author of Rhetoric and the Global Turn in Higher Education

Comparative Education

Centering the Periphery: Questioning the Dominant Model of Internationalization in Higher Education (Review Essay)
The Globalization of Internationalization: Emerging Voices and Perspectives edited by Hans De Wit, Jocelyne Gacel-Ávila, Elspeth Jones, and Nico Jooste

Re-Envisioning Civic Education in an Age of Global Migration (Review Essay)
Citizenship Education and Global Migration: Implications for Theory, Research, and Teaching edited by James A. Banks

Engaging in Powerful Community-Based Global Learning (Review Essay)
Community-Based Global Learning: The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad by Eric Hartman, Richard Kiely, Christopher Boettcher, and Jessica Friedrichs

Intercultural Communication

International Trends in Intercultural Learning (Review Essay)
Intercultural Competence in Higher Education: International Approaches, Assessment and Application edited by Darla K. Deardorff and Lily A. Arasaratnam-Smith
Intercultural Interventions in Study Abroad edited by Jane Jackson and Susan Oguro

Multiple Angles of Multilingualism (Review Essay)
An Introduction to Multilingualism: Language in a Changing World by Florian Coulmas

The Bilingual Approach: Foreign Language Education for the Twenty-First Century (Review Essay)
The Bilingual Revolution: The Future of Education Is in Two Languages by Fabrice Jaumont

A Case Study Approach to Assessment of Intercultural Competence in Higher Education (Review Essay)
Intercultural Competence in Higher Education: International Approaches, Assessment, and Application edited by Darla K. Deardorff and Lily A. Arasaratnam-Smith

Student Affairs

Toward Inclusive Excellence in International Higher Education (Review Essay)
Promoting Inclusion in Education Abroad: A Handbook of Research and Practice edited by Heather Barclay Hamir and Nick J. Gozik

The Importance of Student Affairs to Internationalization (Review Essay)
Internationalizing U.S. Student Affairs Practice: An Intercultural and Inclusive Framework by Tamara Yakaboski and Brett Perozzi

"Big Pit" Versus "Flexi-Self": The Play of Self-Concept in Intercultural Interaction (Review Essay)
The Girl at the Baggage Claim by Gish Jen

Internationalization and Higher Education

Tracking the Migration of Internationalization Concepts and Orientations (Review Essay)
The Future Agenda for Internationalization in Higher Education: Next Generation Insights into Research, Policy, and Practice edited by Douglas Proctor and Laura E. Rumbley

Embracing the Process: Global Learning for All (Review Essay)
Making Global Learning Universal: Promoting Inclusion and Success for All Students by Hilary Landorf, Stephanie Doscher, and Jaffus Hardrick

Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Connecting Theory and Practice in International Education (Review Essay)
International Higher Education’s Scholar-Practitioners: Bridging Research and Practice edited by Bernhard Streitwieser and Anthony Ogden

Global Issues

The Strategic Export of Russian Kleptocracy (Review Essay)
The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America by Timothy Snyder

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