e-Learning Seminar
Member
$69
Nonmember
$109
Event Begins Event Ends Registration Deadline Registration
10/15/2013 10/15/2013 10/15/2013 Registration Closed

What challenges do you face when creating robust international internship programs? With the resource-heavy nature of internship programs, it is crucial that your campus is prepared to meet the growing demand. The international education office can provide unique opportunities to prepare students for a globalized and highly competitive workforce.

presenters Maj Fischer, Cheryl Matherly, and Beth Miller share their experiences with developing and delivering internship options abroad. They offer suggestions on how to adapt these best practices to different campus environments, including offices with limited resources. Webinar participants will gain practical tips on how to establish an internship program and work strategically with partners across the campus and globe.

Objectives

  • Discover how to design and implement international internships that serve the needs and interests of students and partnering organizations/companies.
  • Outline best practices for identifying, selecting, and maintaining relationships with internship partners.
  • Identify ways to adapt these techniques for offices with limited resources.

Presenters

Maj Fischer
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Maj Fischer has directed the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s International Internship Program since its inception in February 2010. Fischer has worked in international/intercultural education for nearly two decades. Preceding her current role, she served as director of academics for the Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS) in Copenhagen, Denmark; associate director of the Peace Corps in Fiji; and associate director of UW-Madison’s International Academic Programs office, the largest study abroad unit on the UW campuses.

While she has lived around the world, Fischer is a proud native of Wisconsin with an undergraduate degree (AB) from the University of Chicago and a master’s in public policy focusing on international development and education policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. She was also a Fulbright participant in Korea, a Peace Corps volunteer in Poland, a summer intern in Brussels, and spent a year in both Finland and Sweden as an exchange student.

Dr. Cheryl Matherly
The University of Tulsa

Dr. Cheryl Matherly is vice provost for global education at the University of Tulsa, where she has responsibility for the strategic leadership of the university’s plan for comprehensive internationalization. Matherly’s special area of interest is with the internationalization of science and engineering education. She codirects the NanoJapan program, funded by the National Science Foundation, in order to expand international research opportunities for students in STEM fields. NanoJapan was recognized by the Institute of International Education in 2008 with the prestigious Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovations in Study Abroad.

She received a second NSF grant for a multiphase conference, Strategic Issues in University Internationalization, which examined comparative approaches in the United States and Japan for the internationalization of science and engineering education. She also coedited the NAFSA publication titled Internships, Service Learning, and Volunteering Abroad: Successful Models and Best Practices with William Nolting, Debbie Donohue, and Martin Tillman. Matherly is the recipient of two Fulbright grants for international education administrators (Germany and Japan). She has a BA in English and political science from the University of New Mexico, an MS in education from Indiana University, and an EdD in education from the University of Houston.

Beth Miller
Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY)

Beth Miller is the assistant director of Baruch College’s Weissman Center for International Business. Since 2002 she has managed the center’s Internship Placement Program and its staff of six in coordinating the matching of students to domestic and international internship opportunities in a variety of fields. She also develops and facilitates various student programs, hosts professional development workshops, and oversees the selection of specific academic scholarships.

Prior to 2002, Miller worked as a marketing communications associate with the financial adviser training program of Morgan Stanley. From 1996 to 2000 she worked at the corporate headquarters of Barnes & Noble, Inc. as staff writer and as acting communications manager. Miller earned her MA in education from Seton Hall University in 1996 and her BA in secondary education from Capital University in 1993.

 

Invite your colleagues to join this webinar! NAFSA webinars are a cost-effective method of staying abreast of the hottest topics facing the field today. With one computer and a projection screen, your attendance is only limited by the number of available chairs.