Updated June 2021

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  • Restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program and Allow for New and Renewal Applications.
    DACA allowed many young people to attend college, obtain driver’s licenses, work, buy homes, and start businesses in the United States. For some college students, DACA also meant they could study abroad.

    UPDATE: On January 20, 2021, the White House issued a Presidential Memorandum for the U.S. Attorney General and the Secretary of Homeland Security to “preserve and fortify” DACA.

  • Establish a Coordinating Council on International Education.
    Chaired by a senior White House official, a coordinating council would provide strong leadership on international education policy and help to restore the United States’ attractiveness as a destination for international students and scholars, as well as to increase the global competency of U.S. students. The council should be composed of representatives from the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Education, Commerce, Energy, and Labor, as well as the FBI, the Social Security Administration, and such other agencies as the President may designate.

  • Rescind Proclamation 10052 of June 22, 2020Proclamation Suspending Entry of Aliens Who Present a Risk to the U.S. Labor Market Following the Coronavirus Outbreak. This proclamation suspends "entry into the United States of any alien seeking entry pursuant to any of the following nonimmigrant visas" until March 31, 2021, on the premise that the U.S. economy needs to recover. However, this expertise is needed in order for the U.S. economy to recover.

    UPDATE: The proclamation expired on March 31, 2021.

  • Rescind Proclamation 10014 of April 22, 2020Suspending Entry of Immigrants Who Present Risk to the U.S. Labor Market During the Economic Recovery Following the COVID-19 Outbreak. This proclamation suspends entry of certain new immigrants who do not already have an approved immigrant visa until March 31, 2021, on the premise that the U.S. economy needs to recover. However, immigrants are needed in order for the U.S. economy to recover.

    UPDATE: On February 24, 2021, the White House issued a proclamation revoking Proclamation 10014.

  • Rescind or Narrow Proclamation 10043 of May 29, 2020Proclamation on the Suspension of Entry as Nonimmigrants of Certain Students and Researchers from the People's Republic of China (PRC). It suspends the entry to the United States of F and J graduate students (undergraduate students are exempt) and researchers from the PRC if they are now or in the past connected through funding, employment, study, or research at "an entity in the PRC that implements or supports the PRC's ‘military-civil fusion strategy’," subject to important exceptions.

  • Rescind the COVID-19 Travel-Related Proclamations That Limit Travel to the United States, in favor of a system that restricts entry based on data-driven public health benchmarks.

    UPDATE: The U.S. Department of State has issued blanket national interest exceptions for many F and M international students, but ambiguous language and lack of visa appointments continue to present challenges. NAFSA will continue to engage the administration on this issue.

  • Revoke Travel Ban 4.0, Proclamation 9983 of January 31, 2020, in favor of a system that restricts entry based on data-driven security benchmarks.

    UPDATE: On January 20, 2021, the White House issued Presidential Proclamation 10141 revoking Travel Bans 3.0 and 4.0.

  • Restore the Fulbright Exchange Program with China and Hong Kong, which was terminated with respect to future exchanges for participants traveling both from and to China and Hong Kong as part of Executive Order 13936 of July 14, 2020, The President’s Executive Order on Hong Kong Normalization.

  • Revoke Executive Order 13788 of April 18, 2020Buy American Hire American. It is based on the incorrect premise that nonimmigrant and immigrant labor harms the U.S. economy and the wages of U.S. workers. However, immigrants and nonimmigrants are needed in order for the U.S. economy to recover and grow. There are other more direct ways that Congress can pursue to directly enhance opportunities for U.S. workers and U.S. industry without fomenting anti-immigrant animus.

    UPDATE: On January 25, 2021, the White House issued Executive Order 14005 which revokes Executive Order 13788 and replaces it with a policy "that the United States Government should, consistent with applicable law, use terms and conditions of Federal financial assistance awards and Federal procurements to maximize the use of goods, products, and materials produced in, and services offered in, the United States".

  • Revoke Presidential Memorandum of March 6, 2017Memorandum for the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Homeland Security: Implementing Immediate Heightened Screening and Vetting of Applications for Visas and Other Immigration Benefits, Ensuring Enforcement of All Laws for Entry into the United States, and Increasing Transparency among Departments and Agencies of the Federal Government and for the American People. This political memorandum restates the obvious, which is that the immigration laws of the United States should be enforced. But they should be enforced wisely, smartly, and through the proper use of discretion.

    UPDATE: On February 4, 2021, the White House issued an Executive Order on Rebuilding and Enhancing Programs to Resettle Refugees and Planning for the Impact of Climate Change on Migration, which revokes the March 6, 2017, Presidential Memorandum.

  • Revoke Executive Order 13768 of January 25, 2017Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States. This political memorandum restates the obvious, which is that the immigration laws of the United States should be enforced. But they should be enforced wisely, smartly, and through the proper use of discretion.

    UPDATE: On January 25, 2021, the White House issued Executive Order 13993 which rescinds Executive Order 13768.  

  • Reaffirm National Security Decision Directive 189 (NSDD 189). NAFSA endorses this recommendation as put forward by the Association of American Universities:
    “Research universities share the federal government’s interest in ensuring intellectual property, proprietary information, sensitive data, and other classified and/or otherwise controlled government information developed or housed by universities is not vulnerable to exfiltration or espionage. The administration must restore proper balance between the need for securing federally funded research and the need to make new scientific knowledge publicly accessible to ensure continued scientific progress. NSDD 189 has enabled the government to strongly protect a narrow set of key technologies when imposing information security controls, while still ensuring the widespread, public, and open dissemination of research results. This clear policy avoids ambiguous measures that make it difficult for U.S. universities to comply with federal security controls.”