NAFSA International Student Economic Value Tool

Economic Value Statistics

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NAFSA's latest analysis finds that international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities contributed $41 billion and supported 458,290 jobs to the U.S. economy during the 2018-2019 academic year.

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NAFSA conducts an annual state-by-state and congressional district analysis of the economic contributions of international students and their families to the U.S. economy.

The economic contributions of international students are in addition to the immeasurable academic and cultural value these students bring to our campuses and local communities.

International Student Stories

Learn what some of America’s best and brightest international students and scholars across the country are doing to create jobs, drive innovation, enrich our classrooms, and strengthen our national security.

International Students at U.S. Community Colleges

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International Student Economic Value at Community Colleges

NAFSA's latest analysis finds that international students studying at U.S. community colleges contributed $2.6 billion and supported nearly 14,000 jobs to the U.S. economy during the 2018-2019 academic year.

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Overall, international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities contribute $41 billion to the U.S. economy and support 458,290 jobs. NAFSA conducts an annual state-by-state and congressional district analysis of the economic contributions of international students and their families to the U.S. economy. The economic contributions of international students are in addition to the immeasurable academic and cultural value these students bring to our campuses and local communities.

NAFSA Analysis: Methodology

International student enrollment data is provided by the Open Doors report published by the Institute of International Education in partnership with the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State.

Tuition and living expense data, which is used to calculate the total amount of economic benefit, comes from the U.S. Department of Education's National Center of Educational Statistics Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).

Data sets used to calculate the number of jobs created or supported comes from the U.S. Department of Commerce, specifically International Trade Administration and Bureau of Economic Analysis.

For a detailed discussion, see "The Economic Benefits of International Student Enrollment to the U.S. Economy."